Dior by Ines Wittke

I don’t think Dior could have used a better word than “paradoxical” to describe herself. The 20-year-old Political Science student and culture editor at the Délit magazine is definitely the type of person to catch your eye in terms of personality and style. She grew up in Dakar, Senegal and currently attends university at McGill. ines 1

I could tell that Dior had an artistic uniqueness to her as soon as I met her. I was so right. Her fashion inspirations were unexpected, yet fascinating. She admires designers such as Issey Miyake for his delicate and poetic work that seems to echo her interest for Japanese culture. Her fashion icons include Margot Tenenbaum from The Royal Tenenbaums movie, and Disney’s Cruella de Vil, which is reflected in her love for thick eyeliner and fur. A stylish gem like Dior does not rely on mainstream brands to fill a wardrobe. Instead, Montreal’s abundant thrift stores inject diversity in her closet. Perhaps, this is why she loves this city so much. Montreal’s strong sense of heterogeneity between neighbourhoods is what makes it so fascinating.

ootmHarmonious clashes and contradictions are what define Dior’s style. She loves London because of the prevalent juxtaposition of posh and punk, and she admires Dali’s twisted mind.

If she could live in a specific historical period, she would chose the African liberalization movements in the 70s that brought about joy and diversity on the African continent.

A fashion guideline, according to Dior, is to allow yourself to dress up “au feeling”: she is all about mixing and matching funky and fancier pieces.

My encounter with Dior was fascinating. Her clothes are as beautiful as her mind, and communicate a valuable message to me. Dior cares little about what other people think, because she embraces her individuality with clever styling. She reminded me how fashion can blossom in such a beautiful way when its icons celebrate diversity and a mixing of culture that inspre uniqueness and intrigue in every outfit.

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